Frequently Asked Questions

We are happy to provide you with answers to some frequently asked questions.  We hope that you find this information useful.  Please note that these questions should not be substituted for professional advice available from your veterinarian, trainer, groomer, canine nutritionist, or other health professional.  Please view our disclaimer for terms of use.

What is the process for adopting a Maine Light puppy?

When is the best time to bring a puppy home?

Are Australian Labradoodles hypoallergenic?

May I come and meet your dogs and puppies?

When should I start training my puppy?

How do I crate train my puppy?

How do I housetrain my puppy?

Will my puppy like the water?

My puppy likes to chew, is this normal?

How do I help my puppy respect my young children?

I want to change my puppy’s food.  What do you recommend?

How often should I bathe my puppy?

Any tips on grooming my puppy?

When should I give my puppy her first trim and what should I tell the groomer?

What is the process for adopting a Maine Light puppy?

Complete our on-line application.

Once your application is approved and we feel that we will have a pup to meet your needs, we request a $350 non-refundable deposit to get on our puppy reservation list.

We keep you posted on mom-to-be and expected whelping dates and notify you as soon as the puppies arrive.

We care for, nurture, and love your puppy from birth.  We gently and frequently handle your puppy so that he has a close connection with humans from day one.  We get to know each puppy intimately, and with temperament testing, assess each puppy with your requests in mind.

We provide you with updates and pictures of the puppies every two weeks.

At four weeks old, final puppy payment is due.

At six weeks old, the puppies are ready to begin preparing for their new homes. We introduce them to new sights, sounds, and textures, and encourage their curiosity for the world so they become well adjusted members of your family.

At seven weeks old, the pups have their first immunizations and veterinary wellness checkups.  We have a very good idea of who the pups will become and suggest candidates to you based on your personal preferences.  We will only offer a puppy who will be a great match for your family.  We invite you to share your preferences with us, and we make preliminary placements.  We assess the puppies' development in preparation for spays and neuters.  The puppies are started on crate, house, and manners training.

At eight weeks old, we make final placements and the pups are desexed if developmentally ready.  Our puppies' well-being always comes first, and if we feel that it is in the best interest of the puppy to do a little more growing before surgery, then we will send him or her home intact with a spay/neuter agreement.

At nine weeks old, your puppy is ready to go home!  Your puppy will be sleeping in his crate through the night.  He will be happy, healthy, playful, eager to learn, and all ready to please you!


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When is the best time to bring a puppy home?

A good time to bring a puppy home is when all members of the family are eager, ready, and committed to training and caring for a new puppy.  It is important for the family to be available to the puppy to help him adjust, learn basic manners, and become a part of the family.  Your puppy will quickly bond with you and adapt to his new home.

We understand that bringing a new puppy home is a big decision and one that shouldn't be taken lightly.  We love our puppies and want to be sure that they have a long and happy relationship with their new families, offering joy and companionship for a lifetime.


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Are Australian Labradoodles hypoallergenic?

Australian Labradoodles have allergy friendly coats, but they are not truly hypoallergenic – no breed of dog is.  Allergies can be triggered by dander, which is made up of protein materials found in the skin and saliva.  Non-shedding breeds leave less dander and so many people with mild allergies do fine with this breed.

If you have asthma and/or allergies, we recommend that you consider allergy testing from your medical professional.  If testing indicates that you are not allergic to dogs, then meet and interact with as many friendly Australian Labradoodles as you can before deciding to bring a new puppy home.  Pet them, hug them, have them give you kisses, and watch for signs of a reaction.

It is best to determine if you have a sensitivity to dander before deciding to bring a new puppy home.  There is nothing more heart breaking than having to give up your puppy after falling completely in love with him.


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May I come and meet your dogs and puppies?

Our first obligation is to protect our breeding dogs and vulnerable young puppies.  Many serious canine illnesses like parvovirus and distemper can be inadvertently carried in on shoes, clothes, and hands from the outside, and can devastate a litter.  We need to be very careful to protect our precious babies and we appreciate your understanding.

If you are on our reservation list for a puppy, we invite you to come and meet the puppies when they are seven weeks old, after their wellness exam and first immunizations.  We ask you to follow our visiting protocol and please refrain from visiting other breeding facilities, kennels, pet shops, dog parks, and public dog areas before coming to see us.  We will also ask you to please remove your shoes and wash hands before meeting and greeting our dogs and puppies.

If you are not on our reservation list for a puppy but would like to meet our dogs, get to know us, or test your allergies, we invite you to come to one of our open houses, which are scheduled throughout the year when we do not have dogs in whelp or young puppies at home.

We appreciate your help in keeping our precious dogs and puppies safe.


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When should I start training my puppy?

Begin training your puppy as soon as you bring him home!!!  We have introduced your puppy to manners, crate, and house training, and so he will be all ready to continue where we left off.  Your puppy is eager and ready to learn anything you want to teach him.  Use positive reward based training – reward the desirable behavior, distract and redirect the undesirable.  Clicker training is a great option.  The Clicker bridges the communication gap, and using a positive approach, lets your puppy know exactly what you would like him to do for you.  If this is your first puppy, read up and do your homework, or ask a trainer to help you.  I would recommend any books by Karen Pryor.

After your puppy has completed his DAPP series and Rabies vaccine, usually around four months old, take your puppy to formal obedience classes and training school.  Also, once your puppy is immunized, provide him with plenty of opportunities for socialization.  Introduce him to family, friends, neighbors, the mailman, children, other dogs, anyone and everyone.  Take your puppy with you in the car, on walks, to the beach, farmer’s market, athletic events, picnics, parties, a friend’s house – anywhere that puppies are welcome!

We can not overemphasize the importance of early training and socialization.  Your puppy will love it and you will be rewarded a thousand times over with a well behaved and sociable companion!


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How do I crate train my puppy?

A crate is your puppy’s own private den for sleeping and resting, a safe and happy place just for her.  Your puppy will not want to make a mess of her resting place, and so the crate is a great tool for house training.

Your puppy will go home in her own crate which will accommodate her for several weeks.  It will be just her size, large enough for your puppy to stand in, turn around, and lie down comfortably, but not so large that she thinks one end is the restroom.  This first crate will be a cozy plastic den to help her feel secure.  As your puppy grows, she'll need to move up to a larger size kennel.  We recommend the open wire kennels for older puppies and dogs, as they have better ventilation and visibility.  A kennel pad is a nice comfort after your puppy is housetrained.

By the time your puppy goes home, she will be sleeping in her crate, staying quiet, clean, and dry through the night.  Continue to encourage your puppy to sleep through the night at home.  Limit water intake before bedtime and be sure she does her business before you put her in her crate for the night.  If she whimpers or wants your attention, soothe her with your fingertips through the openings, or use your voice or music to calm her.  She should settle right down.  Only take her out of the crate if she needs to eliminate, then put her right back in.  As tempting as it is to cuddle with her, you don’t want to teach her to wake you up in the middle of the night.

When you get up in the morning, first thing, take your puppy out to eliminate.  Her excitement and joy to see you and greet you may overwhelm her and make it hard for her to control her bladder, so keep your voice low, calmly carry her outside, ask her to get busy, and THEN give her the enthusiastic greetings!

You can also use the crate for short periods of time during the day when you can not attend to your puppy.  Be sure to take her collar off before putting your puppy in the crate.  And never put your puppy in her crate as a punishment.

Make the crate a fun place to be.  Offer treats in the crate, and plenty of praise, and your puppy will love being in her “private den”.


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How do I housetrain my puppy?

Puppies instinctively prefer not to eliminate near their eating and sleeping areas, and they have a natural inclination to eliminate after meals and napping.  Use this knowledge to start house training your puppy as soon as you bring her home.

Follow these basic principles diligently and your puppy will be housetrained quickly: (1.) Watch your puppy like a hawk, (2.) read her signals and cues, (3.) anticipate her needs, (4.) take her outside before she needs to eliminate, and (5.) establish a cue word like "Busy!".

Take her outside right after drinking, eating, napping, crate time, when she’s sniffing, circling and looking interested, and every two hours when she is awake.

Do not give her free run of the house until she can be trusted.  Keep a close eye on her at all times.  Keep her contained in the room you are in, or tether your puppy to you while you go about your work.  Tethering will teach your puppy to follow your lead, bond with you, and listen to your direction.  You will also know exactly what she is up to!  If you can’t be with her to watch her for short periods of time during the day, put her in her crate.  She will not want to soil her private den.  If possible, roll up and tuck away throw rugs until after your puppy is housetrained.

Don’t keep your puppy’s water dish down for free access until after she is housetrained.  Provide food and water at scheduled times throughout the day so that you know exactly when she will need to eliminate.  Also, limit water before bedtime, and ask your puppy to get busy before putting her in the crate for the night.  When you take your puppy out of the crate after naps or first thing in the morning, pick your puppy up and carry her outside in case she just can’t wait to empty her bladder.

Establish a potty area outside and take her to this area each time you want her to eliminate.  The scent in the potty area will stimulate her to do her business.  Puppies usually need to sniff around a little before getting to business, and many do not like going if they are on a tight leash, so give your puppy a little sniffing and exploring room.  Immediately after she eliminates, enthusiastically praise your puppy, associate a cue for this behavior “Busy!!”, and offer up a treat.  She will quickly learn what “Busy!!” means.  Be sure that you wait until she is finished before offering up this praise, or she may get distracted and not complete her business until she is back indoors!

If you know that your puppy has to eliminate and you have taken her outside with no success, then put her in her crate and try again in a few minutes.  Allow her the privilege of running free indoors only AFTER she has eliminated outdoors.  The key is not to give her too much freedom before she is ready for it.

If she does make a mistake in the house, don’t scold your pup.  She is not trying to defy you, she is just not sure what you are asking her to do.  Just clean it up without much ado.  Use Nature’s Miracle or another odor neutralizer to completely remove odors, and make sure she does not see you clean up after her.  Just try to watch her more closely, read her cues, and take her outside earlier next time.

If you are diligent, your puppy will be housetrained in a very short time.  You will be able to point, say “Get Busy!” and she will do your bidding on request.


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